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From Wikipedia Phoebe Anna Traquair’s illuminated copy of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s ‘Sonnets from the Portuguese’ - Sonnet 30

From Wikipedia Phoebe Anna Traquair’s illuminated copy of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s ‘Sonnets from the Portuguese’ – Sonnet 30

How do I love thee, Word Press, (WP) let me count the ways. And so that you don’t get too big headed about things look out for some gripes that I have.

You are so user friendly, so easy to set up that even a dope like me has almost got it (give me time). And you are free. Free! No there isn’t an echo in the room; if I’ve said it twice it’s because it is worth repeating. Who gives things away for free these days? Sure you have a subtle agenda; you tempt me with upgrades but you don’t nag. You just bide your time, WP, knowing that sooner rather than later I am bound to fall under your spell. I’ve factored a Premium package into my new year’s resolutions, but new year’s resolutions being notoriously unreliable, I beg you not to get your hopes up – yet.

I mean, I wanted to know what I was doing first. Of course there are your helpful articles and I’ve even started to read some (you might have noticed some minor changes), but I don’t want to overtax my brain. Did you know that women used to be denied tertiary education because it was believed that serious studies might fry their brains? It’s one of those useless facts that float to the surface at the most inappropriate moments. But let’s get back to the topic at hand.

I love the editing features. I heard rumours that the WP bunch are writers themselves (so I looked up a couple and it’s true). Being in the Biz is obviously how they know about how fanatical we bloggers can be about writing right. I’m even editing this article (this very sentence) as I go along. How ingenious is the ‘Preview’ before publishing? We bloggers get the chance to read our articles like our visitors do (I love visitors) and pick up several glaring mistakes, then get back to the editing section. Changes can be made even once an article is published. It’s a fabulous tool. Fabulous! Is there an echo in the room? Not an echo, I just thought it was a fact worth repeating. And have I mentioned how I love visitors yet? That’s a topic to I’m saving for another time.

One morning, I woke up and saw double. This is often the case when I have not had my morning coffee. Booze leaves me clear headed (unless it’s Gin,). Lack of a caffeine fix first thing in the AM is something else. I snap and snarl at anyone with the misfortune to cross my path. I rubbed my eyes then put on the reading glasses, then I cleaned the reading glasses. It was lucky for my sanity that I noticed a ‘Your Unique Visitors’ line under the ‘From our Blogs’ section on the stats page. I slugged down my coffee and read Jeff Bowen’s explanation, the fog cleared instantly. I wasn’t seeing double, on the contrary my stats have been separated. The fly-by-nights who don’t contribute a thing are the ‘Views’, the ‘Visitors’ visit. They read and sometimes write and occasionally leave an orange star before moving on. I love the visitors.

So here are the gripes: I love seeing the orange stars when I log on, they are the ‘likes’ but what I don’t like, is the enlarged version on the second bar. And I don’t like the second bar because it means I have to negotiate it to get to my section. I think that’s what we bloggers have been prepared for, for months. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but now that it’s here, I don’t like it. Worth repeating – I don’t like it. I’m sure there’s a technical reason that makes it better or easier for Word Press, but (and I don’t think I’m on my own) I don’t like it. I did not care for the new Freshly Pressed format either, but thankfully this has been corrected. It was convenient to have the Challenges – daily, weekly and photo –on my stats page, I’d like them reinstated. Without choosing it myself I seem to be adding blogs I follow to my list. Because I have liked a particular article and commented on it I seem to have added it to my list even though I haven’t necessarily wanted to.

So, those are the gripes and the praises, Word Press, take them for all they are worth. But thanks for (mostly) doing such a grand job of things.

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4 thoughts on “How do I love thee, Word Press?

  1. Good for you giving praise before airing your complaint. Not too many people do that. I’m pretty much in love with WordPress. My biggest problem with the new changes are with with the reader. The blogger’s avatar is too small, I miss all the thumbnails of graphics on a post, and the pictures are too big. Sometimes, it’s hard to tell where one post starts and another one ends. I forget to go to my stats page, so the changes there don’t affect me too much. Hope you’re doing well today, Mary. I think I missed a post of yours and I’m off to check!

    • I’m fine thanks, Maddie. Went to science works yesterday (an interactive museum), roller blading the day before. It’s the grandsons today, we’re going to the library. Ah, holidays. How restful.
      Maddie, you forget to go to the stats page? Gosh, I can’t imagine it. I’m checking half a dozen times a day (when I’m home). It’s a wonder I have time to write at all.

      • Oh, how I miss all those little field trips and fun days. I don’t really have anything I want to *do* with my stats, so I rarely think to check them. In the early days, I didn’t want to know how many people viewed my blog; it made me too nervous. Seems silly now.

      • I don’t want to do anything with my stats either, except gloat over them. I keep saying it shouldn’t matter, it’s all about the writing, but it somehow does. I’m making a plan. 🙂

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